• Architectural Styles
Toltec style and Maya  Puuc Style of the Northern Maya are found at Chichen Itza.
Chichen Itza's Temple of Kukulkan is dedicated to the Mayan winged serpent God and to the Toltec God,  Quetzalcoatl.   
This pyramidal temple is also called El Castillo.  The stairways of the structure rises on 91 steps constructed at a 45 degree angle. One of the highest structures built by the Yucatan Maya, the temple has four stairways that lead to the top, none open to the public.  A similar temple was constructed at El Tajin in Veracruz State, the Pyramid of the Niches..
  • Temple of the Warriors
Chichen Itza's Temple of the Warriors is a distinctly Toltec-style structure, much like a similar temple in the Toltec City of Tula , north of  Mexico City.
  • Puuc Style
The Puuc style buildings in the Nunnery Complex, are distinctly different than the Toltec style, they have prominent figures of the Rain God Chaac on the facade.

Chichen Itza developed during several building stages.  The Toltec style buildings appear to be related to 9 Th century AD Toltec buildings built at Tula Hidalgo in Central Mexico, about 800 miles north of Chichen Itza. It is still open to debate just how the influence happened and if it was a peaceful cultural interchange or war.
Some researchers believe that the Chichen Itza culture influenced the builders in the north rather than the other way around.
Chichen Itza, Ruin Site, Toltec Influence, Yucatan Mexico
  • Northern Maya
Chichen Itza's Puuc style buildings, in the Nunnery Complex, show northern Maya style figures of the Rain God Chaac on the facade.
The Mayan Archaeological ruin site of Chichen Itza had several building stages including the Puuc style similar to  Uxmal and other Northern Yucatan Maya ruin sites..
  • Ball Court
Chichen Itza' 's ball court  is the largest in Mesoamerica.
Its style is similar to courts in the far north and its carvings are believed by some researchers to resemble those at the ruin site of El Tajin.  

  • Toltec Buildings
several temples have an influence from the north thought by some researchers to be Toltec . The Temple of the Warriors, over 30 feet high 130 feet wide, is built in the style of the Toltec Temple of The Warriors at Tula Hidalgo. in Central Mexico at the 8th Century City of Tula.
The temple includes a Chac-Mool sculpture at the top. (similar to the reclining figure pictured above, left,  from the museum in Merida)
The observatory appears to have   alignments for the observation of celestial events.
  • The Equinox Serpent Shadow
Chichen Itza's Temple of Kukulkan, El Castillo, is dedicated to the Mayan Feathered Serpent God, Kukulkan,  and to the northern God, Quetzalcoatl.
The temple rises on 91 steps that are  constructed at a 45 degree angle. The ninety one steps times the four sides equals 364. A final step to the platform makes 365, the number of days in a solar year.   Four stairways lead to the top.
Along the side of one the stairways, during the afternoon of the Spring and Fall Equinox, a shadow appears in the form of a serpent .  
Chac-Mool, Toltec figures are found at Chichen Itza.
  • Toltecs
Early theorist cited legends that told about the banished Emperor of the Toltecs and his visit to Chichen Itza.  The legends fit nicely with the 9th Century AD Toltec influence from Central Mexico at Chichen Itza
Researchers cite Chichen Itza' s Toltec-style temples that show an influence from the north thought to be from a Toltec. military incursion based on sculptures depicting battles.
The Temple of the Warriors, having square columns with  
base relief sculptures ,is similar to what is found in the Toltec City of Tula, 50 miles north of Mexico City, (800 miles to the north)
The Temple of the Warriors stands over 30 feet high and 130 feet wide.  The many-columned structure, built in the style of the Toltecs of Central Mexico,  is starkly similar to a building at the 8th Century
City of Tula.
The temple includes a Chac-Mool sculpture at the top. (similar to reclining stone figures displayed at the Tula temple of the Warriors.  The figure above, left is in the
museum in Merida)
The debate is ongoing as research continues..
The Temple of the Warriors is 130 feet wide and  30 feet high and has a Toltec Chac Mool figure at the top,
Chac-Mool  Toltec figure displayed at the museum in Merida
The Temple of the Warriors  has a Toltec Chac Mool figure at the top and is similar to temple in the northern city of the Toltecs, Tula, Hidalgo State.
This Toltec influence is believed by some researchers to have come south by way of Mayan merchants.
Others believe that merchants from Chichen Itza brought the influence north to the city of Tula
Others cite glyphs in the Toltec style buildings that depict a story of war and subjugation.
Chichen Itza Ruin Site shows Toltec Influence in its Yucatan Maya  architecture.  Chichen Itza's Temple of Kukulcan combines worship of the Mayan feathered serpent God and the Toltec God, Quetzalcoatl.
  • Air
Flights from Mexico City and international flights reach Merida and Cancun.
  • Cruise
Cruise ships dock in Merida's Puerto Progreso and in Cancun
  • Bus
Chichen Itza is best reached by bus out of Cancun or the City of Merida.  ADO Buses make three trips Daily from Merida, 6:30 AM, 9:15 AM, 12:40 PM. as of Jan, 2012.   (check ahead, times are subject to change)
Valladolid is a good base for Chichen Itza trips   Chichen Itza Lodging, Valladolid
ADO first class buses serve Merida and Cancun from Mexico City , Oaxaca, Vera Cruz, and other cities.  
Chichen Itza ADO
  • Highway
Good, high-speed roads reach Chichen Itza from Cancun, Valladolid, Campeche, and Merida
Bus service from Merida or Cancun reaches the entrance to the ruin of Chichen Itza  ADO
Return bus tickets can be purchased at Chichen Itza near the gift shop.
The Observatory, Chichen Itza
Chichen Itza Ruin Site, the Ballcourt
Chichen Itza's Puuc style Nunnery Complex shows repeated references to the Rain God Chaac.
Diverse architectural styles are evident, one, the Puuc style shows  prominent figures of the Rain God Chaac on the facade.
Buildings in the Toltec style of Tula
Chichen Itza Temple of Kukulkan called El Castillo
  • Equinox Event
Amid the controversy,Chichen Itza has been designated one of the new Wonders of the World. Each year two equinox events bring thousands to witness the figure of a snake form along one stairway of El Castillo, visible in the afternoon of the Spring and Fall Equinox,  March 20-21 and September 20-21
Chichen Itza' 's ball court is the largest in Mesoamerica
Chichen Itza Temple of Kukulkan, also called El Castillo, is built in the  Toltec style of North central Mexico
Chichen Itza lies about half way between Merida and Cancun  (190 miles) and is served by daily buses
from both cities,  At about 75 miles east of Merida, Chichen Itza is an hour and a half trip.
Chichen Itza,
Toltec Influence
  • Mayan
Chichen Itza is a Mayan Archaeological ruin site in North Central Yucatan, the largest Mayan ruin site in Mexico.
  • Toltec Architecture
Chichen Itza is a Mayan center with Toltec style buildings.  The Toltec influence continues to defy explanation by archaeologists.   The building are a mix of styles that prompts research and radio carbon dating in an attempt to resolve the controversy.
The site dates from 300 AD to 1100 AD and is constructed of quarried stone and stucco.  The Toltec influence appears in the ninth century.

  • Notable Features:  
Chichen Itza includes one of the highest temples in the Yucatan, the largest ball court in Mesoamerica, and a round building thought to be an astronomical observatory.
Chichen Itza, Ruin Site, Toltec Influence in Yucatan Mexico
Chichen Itza Toltec Influence
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