Mitla Ruin Site Oaxaca, Mexico, Mosaic Designs
Mitla: Oaxaca Ruin Sites
Mitla Ruin Site, Oaxaca, South Central Mexico
Mitla Ruin Site  (City of the Dead)
Mitla is Located at 16-55' N  and 96-24' W  in the State of Oaxaca on
Route 190, the highway from Oaxaca City to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The ruin site is about 25 miles from Oaxaca City.
Mitla was first built by the Zapotec culture in 200-500 AD and then influenced in later building stages by the Mixtec culture from the northern mountains who had entered the region in 900 AD after the decline of Monte Alban.
Mitla is surrounded by area caves that had been occupied since pre-ceramic times and are continually used today by the local people for religious ceremonies and healing rituals.
Mitla ruin Site is a fee area: 34 pesos.
($3. USD)
Mitla Ruin is done in a unique architectural style with complex mosaic designs throughout the site. Two tomb chambers are open to the public
Mitla  was first built by the Zapotec culture in 500 AD and then influenced in later building stages by the Mixtec culture from the northern mountains who had entered the region in 900 AD after the decline of Monte Alban.  The site was in use when the Spanish arrived.
These same designs to a lesser extent can be found on buildings at the weaving village of Teotitlan del Valle and at the ruin site of Yagul a few miles to the north.
Mitla's cruciform tomb chambers are open to the public. The several chambered tombs have linings done in similar post-classic mosaic designs  and patterns that are found on building facades throughout the site.
Mitla Ruin Site buildings are accessible daily unless repair work is underway
The Spanish colonizers built their church on top of the existing Zapotec temple
Mitla's mosaic patterns have been incorporated by the local weavers into their rug designs. These designs are considered post-classic for the Oaxacan Valley, their stepped fret  patterns done with cut stone and with such intensity as to be unique in Mesoamerica.
Tomb wall designs
Entrance to the tombs is on the patio below the buildings.
Archaeological evidence suggests that the tombs would have been used many times, each new burial accompanied by offerings and the existing skeletons and offerings moved to the side for the new burial.
Oaxaca City  offers  many ruin sites within a few miles of the city. Theses major archaeological sites with building stages that span 1200 BC to 1519 AD are open to the public and can be reached by car, taxi, or public bus.

Other Sites

Of this group
Monte Alban, Mitla, and San Jose El Mogote have museums and can be reached easily by public transportation.

Lambyteco can be reached by public bus or taxi/collectivo while Yagul, Dainzu, and  Huijazoo can be harder to reach by public transportation because of remote access roads .  
Tours to the ruins are available through agencies, or guides in Oaxaca City or the visitor can self guide using the well marked trails and explanatory plaques  done in the Zapotec language, in Spanish, and in English.

Oaxaca is a modern city with many fine hotels, some located in colonial buildings in the historic center of the city.
Gourmet dining, art galleries, theater, and musical concerts are available in Oaxaca's Historic District. Two museums in the city display artifacts, the Santo Domingo Cultural Center and the Rufino Tamayo Museum of Pre-hispanic Art
Mitla Ruin Site Oaxaca, Mexico displays mosaic designs influenced the the Mixtec people who had entered the region in 900 AD after the decline of Monte Alban.Mitla was first built by the Zapotec culture in 200-500 AD and then influenced in later building stages by the Mixtec culture from the north.
Mitla Ruin Site Oaxaca, Mexico displays mosaic designs influenced the the Mixtec people who had entered the region in 900 AD after the decline of Monte Alban.
Mitla was first built by the Zapotec culture in 200-500 AD and then influenced in later building stages by the Mixtec culture from the north.
Click Image for French and Spanish Language Archaeologist Guided Tours of Oaxaca Ruin Sites
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