Tula Ruin Site, Warrior Culture In Hidalgo Mexico
Tula Ruin Site in Hidalgo State Mexico, north of Mexico City contains many base relief sculptures still being studied.
Jorge Acosta was the principle investigator at Tula
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Warrior  Sculptures
Tula's buildings contain remnants of Base relief sculptures and polychrome The art of the city that reached its height in the year 1000 AD after 400 years of building and settlement contains many skull and blood letting motifs.
Tula became the dominant city in Central Mexico in the 9th century with ties far to the south at Mayan Chichen Itza and possibly to the north as far as New Mexico in the USA.
The site shows classic Mesoamerican characteristics, with ball courts Pyramidal platforms, plazas, and altars.
Tula ruin site includes a small museum
Tula Ruin Site, can be reached from Mexico City via Ovnibus which runs service to Tula every 20 minutes each day from Mexico City's Terminal Norte
Sculptures in bas relief adorn temple platforms, many with the stepped fret design found in Mixtec and post classic Zapotec ruins sites
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Wall Sculptures
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Wall Sculptures
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Wall Sculptures
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  City
Eagle Devouring a heart
  • Ritual Center
Tula's  Ritual Center as shown by the plan to the left follows the classic Mesoamerican  layout containing ball courts, a large plaza surrounded and in the center of the plaza, a low platform thought to be an altar.
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Warrior  Sculptures
Tula's   warrior statues were columns to support that roof.  These statues now called Atlantes are thought by archaeologists to represent historic warrior figures and one is believed to be the mysterious Topiltzin Quetzalcoatl, a living god of  myth and legend. The sculptures are adorned with weapons, shields, and ritual jewelry
Reach both Teotihuacan ruin and the Toltec ruins of Tula by frequent service Daily by two different bus lines from Mexico City's  Terminal Norte
Ovnibus runs every 20 minutes  each day from Mexico City's Terminal Norte
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Warrior  Sculptures
  • Warrior Statues
Tula's statues of the warriors, stone columns that acted as huge supports for the roof of a building that occupied the highest ground in Tula,  would suggest that a warrior society ruled Tula.  Much of the base relief sculpture on the walls of the building  depict human sacrifice and blood letting rituals that are supported by legends.
Tula occupied a huge area where tens of thousands of people lived during the 400 years of the city's existence, which peaked in the  year 1000 AD when Tula was the dominant city in Central Mexico.
  • Tula Influence
Tula traded and made war  over great distances as demonstrated by the building of Tula -like architecture as far south as Chichen Itza in the Yucatan.
The deifying of warriors in their sculpture and public buildings would suggest that the Toltecs were a warrior empire.
Tula Ruin Site is called the home of a Warrior Culture because of the base relief sculptures depicting blood letting and a fascination with death.  The large standing sculptures at the Hidalgo site are thought to depict warriors.
some say because they shows Tula Ruin Site is from a Warrior Culture Tula Ruin Site is from a Warrior Culture some say because they shows warrior culture's fascination with death.
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Wall Sculptures
Tula Ruin Site, Toltec  10 Th Century  Wall Sculptures
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